Raising competence using eye tracking

– Our industry requires high levels of knowledge transfer. But many of the skills have now become so habitualised that it’s difficult to pass them on to the younger generation. We’re hoping to use eye tracking glasses to improve the learning process, says Linda Fransson, CEO of Gnosjö Automatsvarvning.    

Gnosjö Automatsvarvning has been selected to participate in a pilot project using eye tracking glasses. The glasses record the wearer’s focus to simplify and streamline the transfer of knowledge to new employees within high-tech industries.

– It’s thanks to our fantastic employees that we can deliver high-quality components, but this requires much more than just training. It’s all about knowledge and experience that has been passed down from generation to generation for almost five decades. It will be very exciting to see the difference when we let new employees see everything through a co-worker’s experienced eyes, says Linda.

The glasses are produced by Tobii, a Swedish eye sensor company. They feature a built-in camera that films the surroundings and four cameras in the frame that follow and film eye movement. In this way, you can see exactly what the person wearing the glasses notices and is distracted by, what requires focus, and what is done automatically. It’s also possible to draw conclusions about what affects a certain decision or behaviour.

The three-year trial period starts in August with Uddeholm and Bufab Lann also taking part in the project. The project is funded by Vinnova, Jernverket, and private companies to which Gnosjö Automatsvarvning has provided co-funding.

– We’re always looking for innovative ways to develop our production and our employees, so the choice to invest in quality and our staff goes without saying. This is an important aspect of our sustainability work and part of our commitment to a culture of innovation, concludes Linda.